koshi nage

Aiki studies – Hip throws and ushiro attacks

In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei (6th Dan AKI Aikikai) explores some of the fundamental Aiki principles underpinning koshi nage (hip throw) applications, including how to safely receive them.

The demonstration applies koshi nage from a traditional attack whereby the uke grabs the wrists of the nage from behind (ushiro ryotedori).

Chicko Sensei breaks the  balance of the uke by entwining their arms which is reminiscent of another Aikido application – juji nage. Related sword based movements and the importance of an upright posture are also examined.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Ushiro ryotedori juji nage 

For comparison purposes, see below a demonstration by Chicko Xerri Sensei of Ushiro ryotedori juji nage.

 

  • chicko-senseiChicko Xerri Sensei – Brief Bio

Our dojo is a Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 40 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Fudoshin Dojo

 

Training notes: Munadori koshi nage

In the below video, Morihiro Saito Sensei (9th Dan) demonstrates 3 versions of the Aikido technique koshi nage  (hip throw) in response to a front lapel grab (munedori).

https://vimeo.com/189767513/settings

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Mundadori koshi nage (Nage takes wrist from below)

 

  • Munadori menuchi koshi nage (omote)

The below video demonstrates how koshi nage is performed if the lapel grab is accompanied by a strike to the temple.

 

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

Training notes – Shomenuchi koshi nage (shiho nage form)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOne of our favourite throws to practice at the dojo is koshi nage (hip throw).  Koshi nage can be applied in response to a wide variety of attacks, incuding where the uke attacks the nage by executing a downward strike to to the temple (shomenuchi).

In the below video Morihiro Saito Sensei (1928-2002) provides instruction on one of the traditional forms of shomenuchi koshi nage as practised by O’Sensei (the Founder of Aikido) in the immediate post-war period of his life. In this particular form the entry is the same as if executing a shomenuchi shiho nage (4 directions throw). For further information on the life of Saito Sensei and his unique access to the Founder of Aikido see the Additional Notes section below.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Learning how safely receive a hip throw

In the below video seniors at our dojo explore the learning progression to safely receive a koshi nage technique.

 

  • Brief Biography – Morihiro Saito Sensei (1928-2002)

morihiro-saito-koshinageMorihiro Saito Sensei’s  practice of Aikido spanned 56 years and he is one of the most important teachers in Aikido history.  Saito Sensei was a live-in student of O’sensei for more than 20 years at his home dojo in Iwama, Japan.

Saito Sensei spent his teaching life dedicated to preserving the technical style of Aikido as practised and shown to him by O’sensei in the post-war period.  Without his commitment to preserving the Aikido of the Founder and extensive efforts to record and document his teachings, much of the Aikido of O’sensei would have no doubt been lost.  The Aikido world owes him a great debt.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Head Dojo Instructor
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

 

 

 

Aikido hip throws for rear chokes – Ushiro kubishime koshi nage

koshi nageUshiro kubishime koshi nage is a traditional Aikido technique which uses a hip throw (koshi nage) as  a defence against a choke attack from the rear (ushiro kubishime).

Aikido hip throws have their origins in a battlefield techniques and not all Aikido schools and dojos train in them.  At Aikido Warrior Dojo, they are a standard inclusion in our training and form part of our commitment to study the Aikido of O’sensei.

bokken koshi nageThey were first introduced into our dojo in early 2014 after permission was granted by Peter Kelly Sensei, Chief Instructor, Aikido Yuishinkai Australia for us to train in them. Since that time we have slowly included a wide range of koshi nage techniques into our standard training repertoire, including ushiro kubishime koshi nage

In the below video Morihiro Saito Sensei (1928-2002) provides instruction on Ushiro kubishime koshi nage as practised by O’Sensei (the Founder of Aikido) in the post-war period of his life.

 

  • Training notes for other koshi nage techniques

See: Unarmed arts by technique – scroll down to “koshi nage” (list is in alphabetical order )

  • Brief Biography – Morihiro Saito Sensei (1928-2002)

saito_seiza_260Morihiro Saito Sensei’s  practice of Aikido spanned 56 years and he is one of the most important teachers in Aikido history.  Saito Sensei was a live-in student of O’sensei for more than 20 years at his home dojo in Iwama, Japan.

Saito Sensei spent his teaching life dedicated to preserving the technical style of Aikido as practised and shown to him by O’sensei in the post-war period.  Without his commitment to preserving the Aikido of the Founder and extensive efforts to record and document his teachings, much of the Aikido of O’sensei would have no doubt been lost.  The Aikido world owes him a great debt.

Ian Grant
Head Instructor
Aikido Warrior Dojo

Playing with koshi nage – A bokken and jo perspective

Although part of the broader Aikido syllabus, one of our favourite techniques to practice at the dojo is koshi nage (hip throw). In fact, there would rarely be a class where this technique does not appear in some form.

bokken koshi nageLike many Aikido techniques, the origins of koshi nage trace back to the battlefield. With this in mind,  we recently resolved to study the technique in the context of paired weapons practice, specifically bokken (wooden sword) vs bokken and jo (staff) vs bokken. Below is a video recording of our first efforts in this regard.

The informally recorded demonstrations are intentionally experimental and involve subtle differences in terms of hand placement on the weapon, form of ukemi, method of moving off-line, atemi, feet position and balance breaking.   All in all a very useful and informative learning exercise.

As a qualifier when viewing the video, please note that our dojo is not a sword or jo school and we are not about learning to “fight” with these weapons.  For us, the purpose of paired weapons practice is to magnify errors in our Aikido technique and to give us the  opportunity to apply Aikido principles in different situations.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo, Brisbane

Related Posts

Training Notes – Ryotedori kokyunage and koshinage

Peter KellyThis video training note examines ryotedori kokyu nage and koshi nage applications.  The video extract is from from a class given by Peter Kelly Sensei (7th Dan, Aikido Yuishinkai) at the Aikido Warrior Dojo on 17 May 2014.

Peter Sensei’s interpretation of koshi nage (hip throw) is heavily influenced by the approach taken by Yoshio Kuroiwa Sensei. Peter Sensei makes the following comment in this regard:

Yoshio Kuroiwa Sensei always taught with a stick to teach lines and internal power vectors and triangulation. He was very martial, an ex boxer. Great understanding of movement. I have tried very hard to follow his style of Koshi. If it’s easy and smooth, no can defence.”

In the video extract Peter Sensei notes that O’Sensei often joked that he could do koshinage all day and not get tired.  The ukemi challenges associated with koshinage are also explored.

Ian Grant
Head Instructor
Aikido Warrior Dojo