Fudoshin dojos Australia

A road less travelled – Aikido pins

In the post-war period of his life, the teachings of Master Morehei Ueshiba (Founder of Aikido) involved significantly less focus on the teaching of pins. This trend has for the large part continued since O’sensei’s death to the point that there are now schools of Aikido that only teach so-called “health pins”.

However, there are still those of us who enjoy and find value in the study of Aiki pins.  At our dojo, for example, we believe the study of pins plays an important role in ensuring that Aikido, in addition to its many other benefits, offers a complete form of self-defence.

The below short video features slow motion demonstrations by Takeda Satoshi Sensei (7th Dan AKI Aiki kai) of a number of rarely seen Aikido pins.  The video was taken during Sensei’s recent visit to Queensland at classes given at Aikido Kenkyukai International Fudoshin Dojo, Sunshine Coast and Fudoshin Warrior Dojo, Brisbane.

 

  • Other Pins

The below pics show demonstrations of other rarely seen pins in modern Aikido practice. All of the demonstrations are by the Founder.


 

Have a great Friday

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Fudoshin Warrior Dojo
Aikido Kenkyukai, Brisbane

Aiki studies – Cross hand grabs

Opposite side one-hand hold wrist grabs are typically one of the first “attack” types taught to new students of Aikido.  The reason for this is that the less aggressive nature of the attack (compared to say a strike) allows the nage (i.e. the receiver of the attack) to more readily focus on such things as correct footwork, moving around the point of contact, basic balance breaking principles, correct posture and movement, maintaining centre and getting off-line.

As we move to Aiki studies, however, the cross hand grab needs to be considered in the context of a more “real world” martial setting.  Specifically, the grab itself is treated as  nothing more than a precursor or set up for a follow through strike to the head or body.

In the below video Takeda Satoshi Shihan (7th Dan AKI Aikkai) provides instruction for dealing with a cross-hand grab from a purely Aiki perspective. As is typical in Aiki studies the emphasis is on principles with spontaneous creation of technique rather than a predetermined Aikido outcomes.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Fudoshin Warrior Dojo, Brisbane
Aikido Kenkyukai

Aiki studies for 2 hand grabs – Kokyu nage

The term morote dori refers to a traditional attack form whereby the uke grabs the nage’s wrists with 2 hands.  Responses to a morote dori attack are practised in our school both from a static position under resistance and also in free flowing form.

In the below video Takeda Satoshi Shihan (7th Dan AKI/Aiki Kai, Kamakura BudoKan) uses both static and free flowing forms of morote dori to explain the Aiki principle of “gathering an attack”.  Sensei explains how to use this principle to take the uke off balance and then project the uke with a kokyu intent.

Associated Aiki principals also referred to in Sensei’s instruction include:

  • relaxed posture,
  • centre line,
  • moving as a single unit and
  • focussing on the entirety of the uke rather than the point of contact.

The video was recorded as part of special class given by Satoshi Sensei at our dojo on 25 November 2017.  

 

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Fudoshin Warrior Dojo, Brisbane
Aikido Kenkyukai

Takeda Satoshi Sensei – Sunshine Coast Seminar

I had the good fortune opportunity on 19 November 2017 to a attend a mini seminar by Takeda Satoshi Shihan at Aikido Kenkyukai International Fudoshin Dojo Australia, Sunshine Coast Australia. It was the first time I have had the opportunity to train with Sensei. Fortunately, the opportunity would repeat itself as Sensei visited our own dojo a week later.  

Whenever I go to a seminar I always hope to either learn something new, gain a deeper insight into something I already have some knowledge of, or otherwise just be inspired. The mini-seminar delivered all three. Further, Sensei was incredibly generous with his time and went to much efforts to ensure we understood his teachings and unique perspectives on higher level Aikido practice.

Key learnings included an exploration of such Aiki concepts as:

  • Gathering an attack rather than fighting it;
  • Finding the zero-point in an attack;
  • Using centreline to take balance and move a uke;
  • Advanced ukemi; and
  • The importance of relaxed good posture.   

Sensei also explained the difference in the way grab based attacks were carried out in pre-war and post war Aikido, specifically the combined use of atemi (strikes) in pre-war times. As an additional bonus, Sensei also demonstrated of various Aiki Budo pins rarely seen in modern Aikido practice.

Dojo friend Steve (AKA Haybigz Bender) recorded the seminar and kindly agreed to let me post his highlights video (see below).

 

Huge thanks to Chicko Sensei for organising the event and also to all the folk from the 2 Sunshine Coast Dojos for making me feel so welcome.

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Fudoshin Warrior Dojo, Brisbane

      

Aiki studies – Hip throws and ushiro attacks

In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei (6th Dan AKI Aikikai) explores some of the fundamental Aiki principles underpinning koshi nage (hip throw) applications, including how to safely receive them.

The demonstration applies koshi nage from a traditional attack whereby the uke grabs the wrists of the nage from behind (ushiro ryotedori).

Chicko Sensei breaks the  balance of the uke by entwining their arms which is reminiscent of another Aikido application – juji nage. Related sword based movements and the importance of an upright posture are also examined.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Ushiro ryotedori juji nage 

For comparison purposes, see below a demonstration by Chicko Xerri Sensei of Ushiro ryotedori juji nage.

 

  • chicko-senseiChicko Xerri Sensei – Brief Bio

Our dojo is a Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 40 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Fudoshin Dojo

 

Aiki studies – Balance breaking for shoulder grabs

ian-grant-katadoriIn the absence of full cooperation, an aikido technique can generally only be created if the uke’s balance is first broken.  This principle equally applies when responding to an attack in the form of a shoulder grab (Katadori).

For many students, breaking a uke’s balance from a shoulder grab to sufficiently facilitate the creation of a technique can at times be quite challenging. This is particularly so where the nage wishes to apply a technique relying on an ikkyo (first teaching) intent.

In the below video, Ian Grant and Jeremy Gehrke Sensei demonstrate an Aiki option that may be used to break a uke’s balance from a static attack position. The application involves using kokyu principles to enhance the traditional balance breaking approach that is ordinarily is used for static katadori applications where there is an ikkyo intent.

Also included in the video is a demonstration of how we typically break the balance of the uke using kokyu principles where the shoulder grab attack is more dynamic and under motion. The principles underpinning this method are discussed further in the “Additional Notes”.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Katadori – Aiki principles

In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei (6th Dan AKI, Aikikai) explores some of the key Aiki principles that underpin higher level practice of katadori. The principles discussed are particularly applicable to Aiki responses to a shoulder grab where there is an ikkyo intent.

Our dojo is an AKI Fudoshin Dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of Chicko Sensei.

All the best

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Fudoshin Dojo

Aiki Studies – Absorbing and redirecting an attack

In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei explores some of the key Aiki principles and concepts for absorbing and redirecting an attack.  These principles and concepts include:

  •  Waiting until the attack is fully committed before attempting to defeat it;
  • Timing when addressing an attack;
  • Using equal energy contact in Aikido practice;
  • Responding to an attack by welcoming, absorbing and then creating technique.

 

  • chicko-senseiChicko Xerri Sensei – Brief Bio

Our dojo is a Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 40 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Fudoshin Dojo