Aikido in Brisbane

A road less travelled – Aikido pins

In the post-war period of his life, the teachings of Master Morehei Ueshiba (Founder of Aikido) involved significantly less focus on the teaching of pins. This trend has for the large part continued since O’sensei’s death to the point that there are now schools of Aikido that only teach so-called “health pins”.

However, there are still those of us who enjoy and find value in the study of Aiki pins.  At our dojo, for example, we believe the study of pins plays an important role in ensuring that Aikido, in addition to its many other benefits, offers a complete form of self-defence.

The below short video features slow motion demonstrations by Takeda Satoshi Sensei (7th Dan AKI Aiki kai) of a number of rarely seen Aikido pins.  The video was taken during Sensei’s recent visit to Queensland at classes given at Aikido Kenkyukai International Fudoshin Dojo, Sunshine Coast and Fudoshin Warrior Dojo, Brisbane.

 

  • Other Pins

The below pics show demonstrations of other rarely seen pins in modern Aikido practice. All of the demonstrations are by the Founder.


 

Have a great Friday

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Fudoshin Warrior Dojo
Aikido Kenkyukai, Brisbane

Aiki Studies for suwari waza – Non resistance

Suwari waza (sometimes referred to as Zagi waza) is a form of Aikido practice performed from the initial position of nage and uke sitting opposite and facing each other while kneeling  (seiza).

In the below video Takeda Satoshi Sensei (7th Dan AKI Aikikai) demonstrates the application of Aiki principles for Suwari waza where the uke strikes the temple of the nage.  This form of traditional attack is referred to as shomenuchi.

As Sensei is exploring responses from Suwari waza shomenuchi from a purely Aiki perspective, there is no predetermined outcome or pin as occurs when practising purely syllabus based Aikido.  The focus is on principle, with particular emphasis on not meeting an attack with physical resistance.

 

The above video was recorded at our dojo on 25 November 2017 as part of a special class by Takeda Satoshi Sensei during his 2017 visit to Australia.

Have a great weekend

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Fudoshin Warrior Dojo
Aikido Kenkyukai, Brisbane

Aiki studies – Cross hand grabs

Opposite side one-hand hold wrist grabs are typically one of the first “attack” types taught to new students of Aikido.  The reason for this is that the less aggressive nature of the attack (compared to say a strike) allows the nage (i.e. the receiver of the attack) to more readily focus on such things as correct footwork, moving around the point of contact, basic balance breaking principles, correct posture and movement, maintaining centre and getting off-line.

As we move to Aiki studies, however, the cross hand grab needs to be considered in the context of a more “real world” martial setting.  Specifically, the grab itself is treated as  nothing more than a precursor or set up for a follow through strike to the head or body.

In the below video Takeda Satoshi Shihan (7th Dan AKI Aikkai) provides instruction for dealing with a cross-hand grab from a purely Aiki perspective. As is typical in Aiki studies the emphasis is on principles with spontaneous creation of technique rather than a predetermined Aikido outcomes.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Fudoshin Warrior Dojo, Brisbane
Aikido Kenkyukai

Aiki Studies: Nikyo shapes and the sword

The term “nikyo” in Aikido literally translates to the “second teaching”.  At its essence a nikyo is a joint-lock technique that pronates the wrist.  This in turn torques the arm and applies painful nerve pressure.

In the below video, Chicko Xerri Sensei AKI (6th dan Aikikai) explains how sword movements facilitate the creation and application of nikyo shapes for Aiki practice.

 

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • Difference between Aikido and Aiki

At its most basic, Aiki refers to the ability to negate and redirect an attacker’s  power without reliance on specific technique and with a distinct absence of muscular tension usually associated with physical effort.

In our school Aikido techniques are not an end in themselves, but rather a “way” to progress to the study and practice of Aiki.  In essence we study to master form so that we can ultimately become formless in our practice.

 

  • Aikido Kenkyukai Fudoshin dojos

Our dojo is an Aikido Kenkyukai Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 45 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great weekend.

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Fudoshin Warrior Dojo

Aiki studies – Spirals

It is not uncommon to read a description of Aikido to the effect that it involves the use of circular movements to negate and dispel an attack. A more accurate statement, however, is that Aikido uses spiralling movements to negate and dispel an attack.

Generally speaking, movements that spiral upwards are used to take the balance of the uke (ie the partner receiving the technique). Downward spiralling movements ordinarily lead the uke into a fall.

Understanding spiralling movements in Aikido is essential if one is to proceed to higher levels of Aiki practice.  In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei (Aikikai 6th Dan) provides a brief introduction to, and demonstration of one of the many spiralling movements that form part of our Aiki studies.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Difference between Aiki and Aikido

At its most basic, Aiki refers to the ability to negate and redirect an attacker’s power without reliance on specific technique and with a distinct absence of muscular tension usually associated with physical effort.

In our school Aikido techniques are not an end in themselves, but rather a “way” to progress to the study and practice of Aiki.  In essence we study to master form so that we can ultimately become formless in our practice.

  • Chicko Xerri Sensei

Our dojo is an Aikido Kenkyukai Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 45 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great weekend

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Fudoshin Warrior Dojo

Aiki Studies: Difference between Aiki and Aikido

At its most basic, Aiki refers to the ability to negate and redirect an attacker’s  power without reliance on specific technique and with a distinct absence of muscular tension usually associated with physical effort.

In our school Aikido techniques are not an end in themselves, but rather a “way” to progress to the study and practice of Aiki.  In essence we study to master form so that we can ultimately become formless in our practice.

In the below video, Chicko Xerri Sensei AKI (6th dan Aikikai) uses the Aikido syllabus technique Shomenuchi ikkyo to explain and demonstrate how the study of Aikido ultimately progresses to the practice of Aiki.

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Our dojo is an Aikido Kenkyukai Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 45 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great weekend.

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Fudoshin Warrior Dojo

Aiki studies – Yin yang

The concept of yin yang is typically associated with the practice of Chinese arts. However, it is also an important aspect of Aikido practice, particularly for those of us who seek to use our Aikido as a method of progressing to the study of Aiki.

The importance that Master Morihei Ueshiba, Founder of Aikido (O’sensei), placed on an understanding of yin yang was referenced in an interview in 2008 with Henry Kono Sensei. Kono Sensei recalled the following conversation with O’sensei.

All of us, the foreign students, had cooked up a little party for his birthday with a cake and everything. That day, he was very relaxed and happy so I thought it might be the right moment to try my luck with a question. I asked him “O Sensei, how come we are not doing what you are doing?” He just smiled and replied “I understand Yin and Yang, you don’t”.”  (Source: http://www.guillaumeerard.com).

In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei (Aikikai 6th Dan) provides a brief introduction to, and demonstration of the importance of yin yang to the practice of Aiki.  Chicko Sensei also explains how yin yang interplays with the concept of connection and initiating movement when dealing with an attack.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Difference between Aiki and Aikido

At its most basic, Aiki refers to the ability to negate and redirect an attacker’s power without reliance on specific technique and with a distinct absence of muscular tension usually associated with physical effort.

In our school Aikido techniques are not an end in themselves, but rather a “way” to progress to the study and practice of Aiki.  In essence we study to master form so that we can ultimately become formless in our practice.

 

  • Taoist definition of yin yang

Yin/Yang : Two halves that together complete wholeness. Yin and yang are also the starting point for change. When something is whole, by definition it is unchanging and complete. So when you split something into two halves – yin / yang, it upsets the equilibrium of wholeness. This starts both halves chasing after each other as they seek a new balance with each other.

The word Yin comes out to mean “shady side” and Yang “sunny side”.

Yin Yang is the concept of duality forming a whole. We encounter examples of Yin and Yang every day. As examples: night (Yin) and day (Yang), female (Yin) and male (Yang).” (Source: http://personaltao.com/).

 

  • Fudoshin Warrior Dojo students – Aiki practice – Yin yang principles 

 

  • Chicko Xerri Sensei

Our dojo is an Aikido Kenkyukai Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 45 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Fudoshin Warrior Dojo