Aikido Grading;

Training notes: Katatedori kotegaeshi

kotegaeshiKotegaeshi is an Aikido technique which involves the application of an outward wrist turn.  It can be used to respond to a variety of traditional aikido attacks, including a same side wrist grab (katatedori kotegaeshi)  .

Aikido Warrior Dojo is a Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th Dan AKI (Aikikai).

In the below video Chicko Sensei uses a dynamic application of katatedori kotegaeshi  to illustrate, amongst other things, the balance taking principles that typically underpin Aikido practice.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Katatedori kotegaeshi – Basic form

In the below video, Morihiro Saito Sensei (9th Dan) demonstrates and explains the basic form of katatedori kotegaeshi as practised by O’sensei in the immediate post-war period of his life.

 

  • Katatedori kotegaeshi – Pictorial explanation  

See below a photo demonstration (including description) by Saito Sensei of the key elements that make up the basic form of katatedori kotegaeshi. 

kotegaeshi-1kotegaeshi-2kotegaeshi-3*Source: “Morihori Saito’s Complete Guide to Aikido” (2015)

  • Brief Biography – Morihiro Saito Sensei (1928-2002)

Morihiro Saito Sensei’s  practice of Aikido spanned 56 years and he is one of the most important teachers in Aikido history.  Saito Sensei was a live-in student of O’sensei for more than 20 years at his home dojo in Iwama, Japan.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Doj Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo

Training notes: Ryokatadori kokyu nage

In the below video, Aikido Warrior Dojo seniors demonstrate and explain key aspects of the Aikido technique Ryokatadori kokyu nage. 

The technique is practised in response to an attack where the uke grabs both shoulders of the nage, most typically under movement. In this particular variation of the technique the uke is projected back in the direction of their original attack.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Ukemi for ryokatadori kokyu nage

In the below video (also taken at our dojo), the nuances associated with receiving ukemi from the featured version of ryokatadori kokyu nage are explored.

 

  • Ryokatadori kokyu nage – traditional version

In the below video Morihiro Saito Sensei (1928-2002) provides instruction on the traditional version of  ryokatadori kokyu nage as practised by O’Sensei (the Founder of Aikido) in the immediate post-war period of his life.

 

  • Ryokatatadori kokyu nage – Tenshin Aikido Federation

In the below video produced by the TenShin Aikido Federation, a detailed examination of ryokatatadori kokyu nage is given with particular focus on the martial aspects of the technique.

In 2003, Renshi Santos Shihan founded the TenShin Aikido Federation (TAF) in honor of O’Sensei and those who introduced TenShin Aikido into his life, including Steven Seagal Shihan.  For some excellent videos on Tenshin Aikido check out their “Rogue Warrior” channel on You Tube.

 

All the best

Ian Grant
Head Instructor
Aikido Warrior Dojo, Brisbane

Congratulations to Chelsea on her 3rd Kyu grading!

Congratulations to Chelsea from our dojo on her excellent 3rd kyu grading in Aikido Yuishinkai on Saturday.

As anyone who has done a grading knows, it’s the preparation and training preceding it that is typically the toughest part. With that in mind, the below video of the event also features some of the training that Chelsea undertook in preparation.

Big thanks to everyone who participated in the grading and helped Chelsea prepare for it.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Head Instructor
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

Training notes: Tanto dori – Munetsuki hiji kime

In the below video, Dojo senior Jeremy Gehrke demonstrates the Aikido technique – Munetsuki hiji kime.  The technique is applied in the context of a traditional knife attack to the abdomen.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Alternate version 

In the below video clip, Mike Jones Sensei from NY Aiki kai demonstrates an alternate version of tanto tori munetsuki hiji kime.  In this version the nage remains standing at the completion of the technique (similar to a traditional kokyu nage ending ).  The principles being applied, however, are the same and equally applicable to the featured video demonstration (above).

Also included in the video are combined elbow and choke retraining techniques for addressing an attack with a tanto.  These techniques are also practised at our dojo.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

 

 

Video compilation – Aikido Warrior Dojo class – 4 June 2016

A fun video compilation recorded at a class at our dojo on 4 June 2016.

Kokyu dosa – Aikido Yuishinkai

kokyu dosaKokyu dosa is an Aikido exercise in balance taking where both partners kneel facing each other.  The exercise is performed with the uke (the receiver of the technique) holding their partner’s wrists or elbows, during which the nage endeavours to take their uke’s balance.  Kokyu dosa in some schools is also referred to as suwari waza kokyu ho.

There are numerous benefits of kokyu dosa practice.  For newcomers to Aikido, it enables them in many cases to experience for the first time what being centred actually feels like.  The practice also allows Aikido principles, such as “centre line”, “centre pole” and relaxed unified movement, to be explored without the added complication of foot work.

Key lessons from the practice include the concept of moving around immovable  points of resistance.  Another is the idea of identifying and moving through “lines of tension” in the uke to take their centre and balance.

Consistent with the traditional approach to Aikido training of its Founder, Master Morihei Ueshiba, kokyu dosa is usually practiced  at our dojo at the end of each class.

In the below video Koretoshi Maruyama Sensei provides instruction on the basic form of kokyu dosa as practised in Aikido Yuishinkai.

 

Other forms kokyu dosa

For examples and training notes for other forms of kokyu dosa see:

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Head Instructor
Aikido Warrior Dojo, Brisbane

Training notes: Ai hanmi katatedori nikyo

nilyo 2Nikyo techniques involve the application of a painful pronating or adductive wristlock to subdue or pin an attacker.  They are a common feature in the syllabus of most Aikido schools.

Nikyo techniques can be used to address a wide variety of attacks.  They are particularly effective in circumstances where the uke attempts to grab the clothing or wrist of a nage (as a prelude to follow up strike).

Our dojo is a Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of Chicko Xerri Sensei 6th Dan AKI (Aikikai).

In the below video Chicko Sensei  explains the sword movements and Aiki principles  which underpin the application of Ai hanmi katatedori nikyo. This form of nikyo is applied in response to an attack in the form of a cross hand grab.

Depending on the school, Ai hanmi katatedori nikyo is also referred to as Kosadori nikyo.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Alternate application (1) Morihiro Saito Sensei

See below a photo demonstration (including description) and video of Morihiro Saito Sensei (9th Dan) explaining the fundamental elements of Kosadori nikyo as practised by O’sensei in the immediate post war period of his training life.

saito-nikyo

saito-nikyo-2

saito-nikkyo-3

 

  • Alternate (Ki no nagare) application (2) – London Aikido Club

In the below video Sensei Andy Hathaway demonstrates and provides instruction on Kosadori nikyo as practised at the London Aikido Club.

 

  • Alternate application (3) 

In the below video Sensei Andy Hathaway of the London Aikido Club demonstrates and provides instruction on an alternate takedown for Kosadori nikyo.

 

Alternate application (4) – Sensei Andy Sato

 

  • Brief Biography – Morihiro Saito Sensei (1928-2002)

saito_seiza_260Morihiro Saito Sensei’s  practice of Aikido spanned 56 years and he is one of the most important teachers in Aikido history.  Saito Sensei was a live-in student of O’sensei for more than 20 years at his home dojo in Iwama, Japan.

Saito Sensei spent his teaching life dedicated to preserving the technical style of Aikido as practised and shown to him by O’sensei in the post-war period.  Without his commitment to preserving the Aikido of the Founder and extensive efforts to record and document his teachings, much of the Aikido of O’sensei may have been lost.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Doj Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo