katatedori

Aiki studies – Spirals

It is not uncommon to read a description of Aikido to the effect that it involves the use of circular movements to negate and dispel an attack. A more accurate statement, however, is that Aikido uses spiralling movements to negate and dispel an attack.

Generally speaking, movements that spiral upwards are used to take the balance of the uke (ie the partner receiving the technique). Downward spiralling movements ordinarily lead the uke into a fall.

Understanding spiralling movements in Aikido is essential if one is to proceed to higher levels of Aiki practice.  In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei (Aikikai 6th Dan) provides a brief introduction to, and demonstration of one of the many spiralling movements that form part of our Aiki studies.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Difference between Aiki and Aikido

At its most basic, Aiki refers to the ability to negate and redirect an attacker’s power without reliance on specific technique and with a distinct absence of muscular tension usually associated with physical effort.

In our school Aikido techniques are not an end in themselves, but rather a “way” to progress to the study and practice of Aiki.  In essence we study to master form so that we can ultimately become formless in our practice.

  • Chicko Xerri Sensei

Our dojo is an Aikido Kenkyukai Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 45 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great weekend

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Fudoshin Warrior Dojo

Aiki studies – Yin yang

The concept of yin yang is typically associated with the practice of Chinese arts. However, it is also an important aspect of Aikido practice, particularly for those of us who seek to use our Aikido as a method of progressing to the study of Aiki.

The importance that Master Morihei Ueshiba, Founder of Aikido (O’sensei), placed on an understanding of yin yang was referenced in an interview in 2008 with Henry Kono Sensei. Kono Sensei recalled the following conversation with O’sensei.

All of us, the foreign students, had cooked up a little party for his birthday with a cake and everything. That day, he was very relaxed and happy so I thought it might be the right moment to try my luck with a question. I asked him “O Sensei, how come we are not doing what you are doing?” He just smiled and replied “I understand Yin and Yang, you don’t”.”  (Source: http://www.guillaumeerard.com).

In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei (Aikikai 6th Dan) provides a brief introduction to, and demonstration of the importance of yin yang to the practice of Aiki.  Chicko Sensei also explains how yin yang interplays with the concept of connection and initiating movement when dealing with an attack.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Difference between Aiki and Aikido

At its most basic, Aiki refers to the ability to negate and redirect an attacker’s power without reliance on specific technique and with a distinct absence of muscular tension usually associated with physical effort.

In our school Aikido techniques are not an end in themselves, but rather a “way” to progress to the study and practice of Aiki.  In essence we study to master form so that we can ultimately become formless in our practice.

 

  • Taoist definition of yin yang

Yin/Yang : Two halves that together complete wholeness. Yin and yang are also the starting point for change. When something is whole, by definition it is unchanging and complete. So when you split something into two halves – yin / yang, it upsets the equilibrium of wholeness. This starts both halves chasing after each other as they seek a new balance with each other.

The word Yin comes out to mean “shady side” and Yang “sunny side”.

Yin Yang is the concept of duality forming a whole. We encounter examples of Yin and Yang every day. As examples: night (Yin) and day (Yang), female (Yin) and male (Yang).” (Source: http://personaltao.com/).

 

  • Fudoshin Warrior Dojo students – Aiki practice – Yin yang principles 

 

  • Chicko Xerri Sensei

Our dojo is an Aikido Kenkyukai Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 45 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Fudoshin Warrior Dojo

Training notes: Katatedori kaiten nage

kaiten-nage-saito-picIn modern Aikido kaiten techniques are typically referred to as “wheel throws” because the uke is projected in a wheel like shape.  Traditionally, however, they were referred to as “open and turn” techniques.  In the text “Budo“, Master Morihei Ueshiba  describes kaiten as a turn and transform movement.

In the below video Mike Jones Sensei of NY Aikikai Dojo provides instruction on one of the basic forms of kaiten nage from a same side grab (katatedori).

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Other common forms of kaiten nage for katatedori 

Morihiro Saito Sensei (8th Dan) demonstrates various traditional forms of Katatedori kaiten nage as practised by the Founder of Aikido in the immediate post war period.

 

  • Katatedori kaiten nage – Christian Tissier Sensei

In the below videos Christian Tissier Sensei (8th Dan Aiki Kai) provides instruction and technical points for 2 of the commonly practised forms of Katatedori kaiten nage.

Video 1

 

Video 2

 

  • Katatedori kaiten nage – “Budo Renshu”

In the below video, Ian Grant and Jeremy Gehrke Sensei of Aikido Warrior Fudoshin Dojo (Brisbane) demonstrate an alternate form of  Katatedori kaiten nage inspired by O’sensei’s 1934 technical manual “Budo Renshu“.

 

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

 

Budo (1938) – Jo dori rokkyo

rokkyoIn 1938 Master Morihei Ueshiba, the Founder of Aikido, finalised the 2nd of his 3 technical texts.  Titled “Budo“, the text contains a sampling of techniques from a wide range of attacks, including grabs, strikes and attacks from different weapons.  “Budo” is an important reference point for our practice at the dojo.

The below video features a photographic demonstration of jo tori rokkyo (Technique 41) as it appears in “Budo“.  Rokkyo is an Aikido arm bar technique and is commonly used to disarm a uke who has a weapon (in this case a wooden staff referred to as a jo).   Also included in the video is a demonstration of the technique by Morihiro Saito Sensei who was a direct student of the Founder for more than 20 years.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Jo dori rokkyo –  Key principles for application 

In the below video, Peter Brady Shihan (7th Dan Aikikai) provides instruction on jo tori rokkyo consistent with that shown in the “Budo” text.  While Brady Sensei is not part of our school, his method of application is the same as that practised in our dojo.

Have a great weekend.

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

Budo (1938) – Tanto dori munetsuki kotegaeshi

morihei-ueshiba-budo-kotegaeshiIn 1938 Master Morihei Ueshiba, the Founder of Aikido, finalised the 2nd of his 3 technical texts.  Simply titled “Budo“, the text contains a sampling of techniques from a wide range of attacks, including grabs, strikes and attacks from different weapons.  “Budo” is an important reference point for our practice.

The below video features a photographic demonstration of tanto tori munetsuki kotogaeshi (Technique 33) as it appears in “Budo“.  The principles underpinning the technique (aside from the disarm) are similar to the unarmed version.  Also included in the video is a demonstration of the technique (including a variation with atemi) by Morihiro Saito Sensei who was a direct student of the Founder for more than 20 years.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Principles underpinning munetsuki kotegaeshi

In the below video Morihiro Saito Sensei gives detailed instruction for the traditional application of munetsuki kotegaeshi.  The instruction applies equally to the armed and unarmed versions of the technique.

 

Have a great weekend.

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

Budo (1938) – Tanto dori munetsuki kokyu nage

iriminageIn 1938 Master Morihei Ueshiba, the Founder of Aikido, finalised the 2nd of his 3 technical texts.  Simply titled “Budo“, the text contains a sampling of techniques from a wide range of attacks, including grabs, strikes and attacks from different weapons.  “Budo” is an important reference point for our practice at Aikido Warrior Dojo.

The below video features a photographic demonstration of tanto tori munetsuki kokyu nage (Technique 32) as it appears in “Budo“.  The technique is very similar to irimi nage with the notable exception that in the demonstrated technique the nage’s hand is placed under the uke’s chin.   Also included is a demonstration of the technique by Morihiro Saito Sensei who was a direct student of the Founder for more than 20 years.

 

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

Budo (1938) – Tanto dori shomenuchi gokyo

morihei-ueshiba-gozo-shioda-1940-croppedIn 1938 Master Morihei Ueshiba, the Founder of Aikido, finalised the 2nd of his 3 technical texts.  Simply titled “Budo“, the text contains a sampling of techniques from a wide range of attacks, including grabs, strikes and attacks from different weapons. “Budo” is an important reference point for our practice at Aikido Warrior Dojo.

The below video features photographic demonstrations of tanto tori shomenuchi gokyo as they appear in “Budo“.  Also included is a demonstration of the technique by Morihiro Saito Sensei who was a direct student of the Founder for more than 20 years.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • More detailed explanation

In the below video, Sensei Andy Hathaway of the London Aikido Club gives a more detailed explanation of the traditional form for tanto tori shomenuchi gokyo.  Of note, the term “rokkyo” is labelled on the video – this may be a mistake or merely a different descriptor used by the School.  Regardless of the label, the instruction appears to be quite similar to the “Budo” version of  tanto tori shomenuchi gokyo.

 

  • Contemporary version of shomenuchi gokyo

In the below video clip, Mike Jones Sensei from NY Aiki kai demonstrates a contemporary version of tanto tori shomenuchi gokyo.  Also included in the demonstration is instruction on how to take the knife from the uke following the pin.

 

  • Alternate standing pin and disarm

Gokyo pin 1

Gokkyo pin 2

 

 

 

 

 

Have a great week.

Ian Grant
Head Instructor
Aikido Warrior Dojo