Budo

Budo (1938) – Jo dori rokkyo

rokkyoIn 1938 Master Morihei Ueshiba, the Founder of Aikido, finalised the 2nd of his 3 technical texts.  Titled “Budo“, the text contains a sampling of techniques from a wide range of attacks, including grabs, strikes and attacks from different weapons.  “Budo” is an important reference point for our practice at the dojo.

The below video features a photographic demonstration of jo tori rokkyo (Technique 41) as it appears in “Budo“.  Rokkyo is an Aikido arm bar technique and is commonly used to disarm a uke who has a weapon (in this case a wooden staff referred to as a jo).   Also included in the video is a demonstration of the technique by Morihiro Saito Sensei who was a direct student of the Founder for more than 20 years.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Jo dori rokkyo –  Key principles for application 

In the below video, Peter Brady Shihan (7th Dan Aikikai) provides instruction on jo tori rokkyo consistent with that shown in the “Budo” text.  While Brady Sensei is not part of our school, his method of application is the same as that practised in our dojo.

Have a great weekend.

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

Budo (1938) – Tanto dori munetsuki kotegaeshi

morihei-ueshiba-budo-kotegaeshiIn 1938 Master Morihei Ueshiba, the Founder of Aikido, finalised the 2nd of his 3 technical texts.  Simply titled “Budo“, the text contains a sampling of techniques from a wide range of attacks, including grabs, strikes and attacks from different weapons.  “Budo” is an important reference point for our practice.

The below video features a photographic demonstration of tanto tori munetsuki kotogaeshi (Technique 33) as it appears in “Budo“.  The principles underpinning the technique (aside from the disarm) are similar to the unarmed version.  Also included in the video is a demonstration of the technique (including a variation with atemi) by Morihiro Saito Sensei who was a direct student of the Founder for more than 20 years.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Principles underpinning munetsuki kotegaeshi

In the below video Morihiro Saito Sensei gives detailed instruction for the traditional application of munetsuki kotegaeshi.  The instruction applies equally to the armed and unarmed versions of the technique.

 

Have a great weekend.

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

Budo (1938) – Tanto dori munetsuki kokyu nage

iriminageIn 1938 Master Morihei Ueshiba, the Founder of Aikido, finalised the 2nd of his 3 technical texts.  Simply titled “Budo“, the text contains a sampling of techniques from a wide range of attacks, including grabs, strikes and attacks from different weapons.  “Budo” is an important reference point for our practice at Aikido Warrior Dojo.

The below video features a photographic demonstration of tanto tori munetsuki kokyu nage (Technique 32) as it appears in “Budo“.  The technique is very similar to irimi nage with the notable exception that in the demonstrated technique the nage’s hand is placed under the uke’s chin.   Also included is a demonstration of the technique by Morihiro Saito Sensei who was a direct student of the Founder for more than 20 years.

 

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

Budo (1938) – Tachi dori shomenuchi kokyu nage

bokken 1(a)In 1938 Master Morihei Ueshiba, the Founder of Aikido, finalised the 2nd of his 3 technical texts.  Simply titled “Budo“, the text contains a sampling of techniques from a wide range of attacks, including grabs, strikes and attacks from different weapons.

Budo” is an important reference point for our practice at Aikido Warrior Dojo. The techniques and principles referred to therein are regularly practised.

Interestingly, the Founder only included 3 tachi dori techniques in his 2nd text.  Further, 2 of the 3 techniques are variations of tachi dori shomenuchi kokyu nage.  In the first version (Technique 28) the nage enters to the uke’s right and in the second (Technique 29) enters to the uke‘s left.  Notably, in both techniques the Founder always enters on the same side as his forward foot (thereby ensuring he does not move under the vertically cutting blade).

The below videos feature photographic demonstrations of  both versions of bokken tori shomenuchi kokyu nage as they appear in “Budo”.  Also included are demonstrations of the techniques by Morihiro Saito Sensei who was a direct student of the Founder for more than 20 years.

  • Bokken tori shomenuchi kokyu nage (Technique 28)

 

  • Bokken tori shomenuchi kokyu nage (Technique 29)

For comparative purposes, the following video includes both the pre-war (Budo) version of the subject technique and also the post war version. Both versions are practised at our dojo.

 

Have a great week.

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

Budo (1938) – Tanto dori shomenuchi gokyo

morihei-ueshiba-gozo-shioda-1940-croppedIn 1938 Master Morihei Ueshiba, the Founder of Aikido, finalised the 2nd of his 3 technical texts.  Simply titled “Budo“, the text contains a sampling of techniques from a wide range of attacks, including grabs, strikes and attacks from different weapons. “Budo” is an important reference point for our practice at Aikido Warrior Dojo.

The below video features photographic demonstrations of tanto tori shomenuchi gokyo as they appear in “Budo“.  Also included is a demonstration of the technique by Morihiro Saito Sensei who was a direct student of the Founder for more than 20 years.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • More detailed explanation

In the below video, Sensei Andy Hathaway of the London Aikido Club gives a more detailed explanation of the traditional form for tanto tori shomenuchi gokyo.  Of note, the term “rokkyo” is labelled on the video – this may be a mistake or merely a different descriptor used by the School.  Regardless of the label, the instruction appears to be quite similar to the “Budo” version of  tanto tori shomenuchi gokyo.

 

  • Contemporary version of shomenuchi gokyo

In the below video clip, Mike Jones Sensei from NY Aiki kai demonstrates a contemporary version of tanto tori shomenuchi gokyo.  Also included in the demonstration is instruction on how to take the knife from the uke following the pin.

 

  • Alternate standing pin and disarm

Gokyo pin 1

Gokkyo pin 2

 

 

 

 

 

Have a great week.

Ian Grant
Head Instructor
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

Training notes: Katatedori irimi nage

In 1938 Master Morihei Ueshiba, the Founder of Aikido, finalised the 2nd of his 3 technical texts.  Simply titled “Budo“, the text contains a sampling of techniques from a wide range of attacks, including grabs, strikes and attacks from different weapons.

Notably the first complete technique referred to in “Budo” is katatedori irimi nage.  Its early placement in the text and the level of explanation that is given suggests the importance that the Founder placed on this technique.  This is further supported by its inclusion in the Founder’s 3rd technical text (“Maki no ichi”) from the early 1950’s where again it is covered in detail relative to other techniques in that text.

The below video features photographic demonstrations of katatedori irimi nage as they appear in “Budo“.  Also included is a demonstration of the technique by Morihiro Saito Sensei who was a direct student of the Founder for more than 20 years.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Description of technique in “Budo” (Drawings from “Maki no ichi”)

katatedori iriminage 1

Uke – “Grab partner’s left wrist with your tight hand”

 

 

 

 

 

katatedori iriminage 2

(2) Nage – “Put strength into your fingertips of your left hand, turn the palm of hand upward, slide forward diagonally and enter deeply to your partner’s right.

Remain aware of attacks from the rear”

 

 

 

 

katatedori iriminage 3(3) Nage – “Grab your partner’s right wrist from underneath with your right hand, release his grip and strike his face.”

 

 

 

 

katatedori iriminage 6(4) Nage – “Slide in further, grab his collar (or pin his hips against your body), step forward on your right foot bringing your partner’s arm around his neck and then down him.

During this last part of the technique it is vital to put strength in your finger tips of your right hand and bring your arm down to the inside.”

 

  • Katate dori irimi nage – Post war forms

In the below video Morihiro Saito Sensei (1928-2002) demonstrates the 3 versions of katatadori irimi nage nage practised by O’Sensei (the Founder of Aikido) in the immediate post-war period of his life.

 

  • Katate dori irimi nage – Aikido Yuishinkai version

In the below video Peter Kelly Sensei, International Instructor, Aikido Yuishinkai  provides instruction on an alternate version of katate dori irimi nage.  The video was recorded at our dojo in 2015.

 

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Dojo

 

Budo Manual – Chart of Techniques

336890In the 1930’s Master Morihei Ueshiba (O’sensei), the Founder of Aikido, published two known technical manuals for his Art.  Both manuals are a source of constant reference at our dojo and form an important part of our study of O’Sensei’s Aikido through Aikido Kenkyukai.

The second of the two manuals, and certainly the most well-known, is simply titled Budo (1938).  The content of this 2nd manual is supported by step by step photographs and instructional commentary for each technique.

For a convenient overview of the techniques referenced in the manual see below a chart that was prepared by Preston Aikido Sakura Dojo in Preston, Lancashire, UK.

Budo Chart

 

Ian Grant
Head Instructor
Aikido Warrior Dojo