aiki

Learnings from the sword – Dealing with shoulder grabs

Ian Grant SenseiA key aspect of our practice at the dojo is to use traditional sword movements to enhance and improve our unarmed arts.  Our practice in this regard incorporates the use of a wide range of bokkens including the shoto (short sword), suburito and Musashi oar.

Exploring Aikido in this way is in line with comments made by Master Morihei Ueshiba (The Founder of Aikido) that Aikido at its essence is a form of taijutsu that incorporates traditional sword principles

In the below video Ian Grant and Jeremy Gehrke Sensei use the short sword to explore the Aiki principles associated with absorbing and redirecting an an attack in the form of a shoulder grab (katadori).

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Aiki principles and katadori

In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei explores some of the key Aiki principles that underpin Aikido forms to address an attack from a shoulder grab. An integral part of the instruction in both videos is the use of the bokken to enhance understanding of the basic movements used in this type of practice.

 

  • chicko-senseiChicko Xerri Sensei – Brief Bio

Our dojo is a Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 40 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great weekend

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Fudoshin Dojo

 

Aiki Studies – Gathering and releasing energy

In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei explores the Aiki concept of moving off-line to gather and release the energy of an attack so as to diffuse and redirect it.  This method of addressing an attack was very typical of the Founder’s Aikido in his later years.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Gathering principle – 2 person attacks

In the following video Chicko Sensei applies the Aiki principle of “gathering energy” to a 2 person attack scenari (Futari dori).  Chicko Sensei discusses visualisation methods to assist in understanding the principle, as well as the importance of  breathing, moving off the line and aligning with the incoming energy of the attacks.

 

  • chicko-senseiChicko Xerri Sensei – Brief Bio

Our dojo is a Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 40 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Fudoshin Dojo

 

Aiki Studies – Moving offline with natural posture

In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei explores the Aiki concept of moving offline while at the same time a maintaining a natural posture.  This method of movement typified the expression of Aikido demonstrated by Master Morihei Ueshiba (The Founder of Aikido) in the later parts of his life.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Exercises and applied practice

In the below video Aikido Warrior Dojo seniors demonstrate exercises and practical applications to develop skills in moving off-line while maintaining natural posture.

 

  • chicko-senseiChicko Xerri Sensei – Brief Bio

Our dojo is a Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 40 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Fudoshin Dojo

 

Aiki Studies – Moving offline to create opportunity

In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei explores the Aiki concept of moving off-line to create an opportunity to defeat or diffuse an attack.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • chicko-senseiChicko Xerri Sensei – Brief Bio

Our dojo is a Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 40 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Fudoshin Dojo

 

Ki, Aiki and Aikido – A practical training perspective

The notion of ki and its role in Aikido training can be one of the most confusing, obscure and sometimes divisive concepts in our Art. Finding an understandable definition of ki can be quite challenging to say the least, particularly as its meaning differs depending on the context in which the term is used. Cultural and language barriers also pose a challenge.

morihei-ueshiba-gozo-shioda-1940-croppedFrom a practical Aikido training perspective, however, one of the most readily understandable, pithy and helpful explanations on the subject is that given by Gozo Shioda Sensei in his text Total Aikido: The master course (1997).  He states:

In Aikido we often use the word “ki,” or energy, but this word covers a variety of meanings. “Ki” as it is manifested in the performance of techniques is what we have when the components of correct posture, centre line, breathing, the explosive power of forced energy, timing, etc., come together so that we reach the highest state of perfect balance. It might be said that “ki” is “the mystery of balance.”  ……

“Aiki” (i.e. harmonising of energy) means to lose your ego, it is the technique of submitting to the natural flow of the universe. By doing that you can effortlessly realize your own natural self-defending on the situation that is in front of you, and it is by developing this harmony that we find the realization of aikido.”

So, if I’m reading this right, what is being suggested is that ki in Aikido practice should be looked at as the highest state of “perfect balance” that can be acquired through ego free training that focusses on the basics. Sounds like a pretty good way to train to me.

All the best in your training in 2015.

Ian

Ian Grant
Head Instructor
Aikido Warrior Dojo