Ian Grant Sensei

Aikido is not resistance – A true warrior contests with nothing

There are no contests in the art of peace.  A true warrior contests with nothing. Defeat means to defeat the mind of contention that we harbor within.”

(Master Morihei Ueshiba, Founder of Aikido)

 

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Fudoshin Dojo,
Brisbane

Learning from other martial arts – Jodan tsuki kokyu nage

Its always disappointing to read and hear martial artists criticise how each other train and make comparative negative assessments on the worthiness of differing Aikido schools and martial systems. Martial art bigotry of this kind has never had a place in our dojo and never will.

We have had the privilege on many occasions of having visitors train with us from different styles of Aikido and martial arts systems, including judo, tai chi chuan, taekwondo, jujitsu and traditional sword practitioners.  In all instances the interaction has not only given us some insights into their respective martial art/sport, but equally importantly given us greater understanding of our own Aikido and training practices.

In the below video, Dojo Senior Jeremy Gehrke, who is also boxing student, gives me the opportunity practice my Aiki parrying skills in response to committed boxing strikes.  The technique that is ultimately applied (on the change of strike) is a form of breath throw – Jodan tsuki kokyu nage.

I should add that the video should not be viewed as Aikido vs boxing.  Nothing could be further from the truth. Jeremy is doing no more than giving me two forms of committed boxing strikes  and allowing me to practice and develop responses to them using Aiki principles.  In short, he is a training partner graciously assisting me to learn and not a competitor in any way.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Conventional practice for jodan tsuki  

In the below video Dojo seniors (Ian Grant and Peter Marendy) practice jodan tsuki as it is typically trained in our dojo.

 

  • Jodan tsuki

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Jodan tsuki ikkyo – Multiple strike application

 

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Fudoshn Dojoi

“Creating a place to move” – Aiki principles for ushiro training

Ushiro in Aikido training refers to a broad set of attack forms whereby the uke attacks the nage from behind.  Examples of ushiro attack forms include:

  • Ushiro Ryotedori: When attacker grabs both wrists from behind (see photo of O’sensei on right).
  • Ushiroeri katatedori: When the attacker grabs the rear collar and wrist.
  • Ushiro Hiji-tori: When both elbows are grabbed from behind.
  • Ushiro Ryokatatori: When both shoulders are grabbed from behind.
  • Ushiro Tekubitori Kubishime: When the neck is being strangled and a wrist is disabled.

In dynamic Aikido practise an ushiro attack is typically initiated from the front such that the uke enters first by grabbing the wrist and then moves to the rear of the nage.  The grabbing of the wrist can occur intentionally (eg the uke intends to undertake a ushiro ryotedori attack) or as a result of the nage responding to the initial attack by using their hand-sword to make connection and initiate defensive action.

In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei (6th dan – AKI Aikikai) demonstrates the aiki principle of “creating a place to move” at first contact to create immediate opportunity for Aikido technique.  Notably, the approach taken by Chicko Sensei differs to what is often seen in Aikido practise whereby the nage takes the higher risk martial option of allowing the uke to move around to the nage‘s rear.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Alternate option for creating space

In the below video, seniors from Aikido Warrior Fudoshin Dojo demonstrate an alternate irimi based option for creating a place to move.

 

  • Other Aiki principles for ushiro practice

Chicko Sensei in the following video provides an overview of other Aiki principles important for ushiro practice. Notably, Sensei uses the sword to demonstrate the origins of the principles.   

 

  • chicko-senseiChicko Xerri Sensei – Brief Bio

Our dojo is a Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 40 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Fudoshin Dojo

 

Training notes: Ai hanmi katatedori hiji nage

Hiji waza (elbow techniques) are always practised with a high degree of caution.  These forms of Aiki applications rely on pressure either being applied to the elbow joint or alternately locking the elbow joint to facilitate the balance taking necessary to execute the throw.

In the below video seniors from our dojo demonstrate one of the most basic forms of hiji waza – Ai hanmi katatedori hiji nage (sometimes also referred to as kosadori hiji nage).  This particular type of projection is practised from an attack in the form of an opposite single hand grab to the wrist.

Notably in some schools the technique is labelled as a form kokyu nage (breath throw).  This is most appropriate given the kokyu ho based movement underpinning the application.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

  • Demonstration – Morihiro Saito Sensei

 

  • Takemusu Aikido (volume 4)

 

  • Alternate projection application

In the below video S Crane Sensei demonstrates and provides instruction for an alternate elbow projection application referred to as Ai hanmi katatedori hiji kime.

 

Aiki Studies – Absorbing and redirecting an attack

In the below video Chicko Xerri Sensei explores some of the key Aiki principles and concepts for absorbing and redirecting an attack.  These principles and concepts include:

  •  Waiting until the attack is fully committed before attempting to defeat it;
  • Timing when addressing an attack;
  • Using equal energy contact in Aikido practice;
  • Responding to an attack by welcoming, absorbing and then creating technique.

 

  • chicko-senseiChicko Xerri Sensei – Brief Bio

Our dojo is a Fudoshin dojo operating under the guidance and mentorship of  Chicko Xerri Sensei, 6th dan AKI (Aikikai), Tokyo.  Chicko Sensei has been practising and teaching Aikido for more than 40 years and is endorsed by Doshu Ueshiba.

Have a great week

Ian Grant
Dojo Cho
Aikido Warrior Fudoshin Dojo